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Shri Krishna followed 100% Ahimsa and not Himsa during the war. 

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Most would think what Shri Krishna ordered in a war was careless harm while it is not so. “Not doing” ones prescribed duty will cause more deaths and more harm on the other end.
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“Yamas, and its complement, niyamas, represent a series of “right living” or ethical rules within Hinduism and Yoga. These are a form of moral imperatives, commandments, rules or goals. Every religion has a code of conduct, or series of “do’s and don’ts”” 

While trying to follow the Yamas 

“Ahimsa (अहिंसा): Nonviolence. Abstinence from injury that arises out of love for all, harmlessness, the not causing of pain to any living creature in thought, word, or deed at any time. This and Satya (सत्य) are the “main” yama. The other eight are there in support of its accomplishment.” 

is the first step. 

And without Strictly following “Ahimsa” the further contexts of religious teachings cannot be understood.

E.g. Most would think what Shri Krishna ordered in a war was careless harm while it is not so. “Not doing” ones prescribed duty will cause more deaths and more harm on the other end. 

Note: IT IS IMPORTANT TO READ THE ENTIRE PART CAREFULLY 
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To understand this context clearly it is necessary to understand what a doctor does while terminating a life on the operation table. 

1.) When 2 lives are in danger and terminating “one” will save “one” then “one” life must be terminated. If a doctor says I cannot commit to terminating a life as it is a heinous thing to do, then both life will die. Here “one” life dies unnecessarily? Does a doctor do anything wrong while terminating 1 life? No not at all. 

2.) Having said so, it is also important for a doctor to tirelessly keep checking reasons that reached the ethical dilemma. It is a must for the doctor to ensure those dilemmas are never reached again.

3.) While doing these operations the doctors must ensure one thing… they need to always keep remembering it is *not appropriate to kill even 1 life*. Because the day the doctor thinks “It is ok to kill”, that very day things change for the doctor. The doctor will very likely forget to save lives… and that “It is ok to kill” will become a habit, and will then commit a sin, and thereafter because the doctor stops trying more lives will unnecessarily die?
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SO, here a doctor does follow Ahimsa and not Himsa. The doctor acted to save 1 life or otherwise both lives would have died.

To end with, without following 100% Ahimsa the eternal moral values cannot be understood, it is a step by step realization process.

(So far this is what I have understood, if it is wrong, kindly clarify)

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